A Cry for Freeware

Freeware and demos still matterFreeware, trial versions and demo software applications have gotten an incredibly bad reputation over the last decade or so. What once started as a mechanic meant to help, above all others, the user, was twisted and deformed by aggressive marketers in an instrument of propaganda and into an advertising machine. Filled with brand-exposure strategies, like traps and hidden (or at the very least less-than-obvious) components and side features, like browser taskbars, homepage modifications, desktop web-link shortcuts and other forms of invasive and intrusive behavior has made people very suspicious of this software category. Free demonstrations applications have also been used by hackers as a medium to distribute malware and computer viruses, which only contributed to their bad reputation.

Unfortunately, this has made users give free demos a wide berth and steer clear from them.

Today’s mercantile, competitive market has also promoted a very linear train of thought: if it’s cheap, it lacks quality. Filled with cynicism, we’ve also concluded that if something is free, than it’s a trap. I mean, there has to be a hidden catch somewhere, right? Nothing in life is free. Everyone pays the ferryman, one way or another. Continue reading